What Are The 9 Types Of Discrimination?

What are the 9 protected characteristics in the Equality Act 2010?

The Equality Act covers the same groups that were protected by existing equality legislation – age, disability, gender reassignment, race, religion or belief, sex, sexual orientation, marriage and civil partnership and pregnancy and maternity..

What is positive discrimination?

Positive discrimination is the process of increasing the number of employees from minority groups in a company or business, which are known to have been discriminated against in the past.

What are the main points of the Equality Act 2010?

The characteristics that are protected by the Equality Act 2010 are:age.disability.gender reassignment.marriage or civil partnership (in employment only)pregnancy and maternity.race.religion or belief.sex.More items…

What is appearance discrimination?

Appearance-based discrimination occurs when someone is treated differently based on how they look, creating an imbalance between someone being evaluated for their performance versus purely based on the way they present themselves.

Why is positive discrimination allowed?

Treating one person more favourably than another because they have a protected characteristic. Positive discrimination because of a person’s disability is allowed, and may sometimes be required if there is a duty to make reasonable adjustments. …

What are the 6 types of discrimination?

Each characteristic is addressed in the Act in summary as follows:Age. … Disability. … Gender Reassignment. … Marriage & Civil Partnership. … Pregnancy & Maternity. … Race. … Religion or Belief. … Sex.More items…•

What is discrimination and examples?

Discrimination can be based on many different characteristics—age, gender, weight, ethnicity, religion, or even politics. For example, prejudice and discrimination based on race is called racism. Oftentimes, gender prejudice or discrimination is referred to as sexism.

What is the main purpose of the Equality Act 2010?

The Equality Act 2010 legally protects people from discrimination in the workplace and in wider society. It replaced previous anti-discrimination laws with a single Act, making the law easier to understand and strengthening protection in some situations.

What is a direct discrimination?

Direct discrimination This is when you are treated worse than another person or other people because: you have a protected characteristic. someone thinks you have that protected characteristic (known as discrimination by perception)

What are the different types of discrimination?

These are:Age.Disability.Gender reassignment.Marriage and civil partnership.Pregnancy and maternity.Race.Religion or belief.Sex.More items…•

What are the main points of the Equality Act?

The Act protects people against discrimination, harassment or victimisation in employment, and as users of private and public services based on nine protected characteristics: age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex, and sexual …

Why is positive discrimination bad?

Positive discrimination is patronising and can entrench discriminatory attitudes, implying that those with certain characteristics may not otherwise have the skills and knowledge to secure jobs. Then there’s reputation damage.

What are the 4 main types of discrimination?

There are four main types of discrimination that are important in schools; direct discrimination and indirect discrimination, harassment and victimisation. Direct discrimination in schools is when a child is treated less favourably on the grounds of gender, disability, race, sexual orientation, religious belief or age.

How do you challenge discrimination?

There are three things you can do:Complain informally to your employer.Raise a grievance using your employer’s grievance procedures.Make a claim to the Employment Tribunal.

What is positive female discrimination?

When striving for gender balance in recruitment, it is illegal to treat a candidate applying for a role more favourably on the grounds of the nine ‘protected characteristics’ – race, gender, disability, marital status, religion/belief, pregnancy, sexual orientation and gender reassignment.